For the last two months, my daily breakfast and lunch consisted out of the same kind of steamed dumplings – I’m on a varied diet, can you tell? Do I still love them? Yes. Do I think that having about 120 (of the same) dumpling meals in two months is gross? Yes. But no judgement please, it already sucks that I have to take a shower and get dressed before I can get any breakfast, you can’t expect me to walk 15 minutes in the cold as well, right?

The recipe I post today are not the same dumplings, but you might still want to eat them for breakfast and lunch on the same day. Half of them were steamed, half of them were pan-fried. I wasn’t a big fan of the fillings, as they included fennel – which apparently I don’t like – and I prefer a more meatier filling; the more meat, the merrier. The dumplings were delicious nevertheless, but if you want to try a different filling, be my guest and let me know how it worked out.

Recipe from Hutong Cuisine.

*I have the recipes for three fillings and three cooking techniques, but unfortunately I really fail in explaining how to fold the dumplings and I also lack the pictures of that process, since I was so focussed on paying attention myself that I forgot to take pictures. Luckily, youtube is full of videos of people who are able to show you how to do it, so if you’re interested, have look over here (at 1:50 she starts working with the dough: rolling it out into a log, cutting it into pieces and rolling out the individual wrappers) and here (for how to fold the dumplings). 

**If you think that making your own dough if too much of an effort – which I can totally understand – you could also buy wonton wrappers at an Asian supermarket.

Dumpling dough
100 g flour
60 g boiling water (this makes the dough softer)

Put the flour in a mixing bowl and add the water, mix until it becomes a ball. Cover for 15 minutes with a damp towel. Mix again and roll it into a long log, cut into 15 pieces. Cover again with a damp towel until you will use them.

Sauce for dipping
6 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
3 tbsp dark vinegar
3 tbsp light soy sauce
1 tsp sesame oil
chili oil, optional

Filling 1: egg with chives
2 eggs
130 g chives, finely chopped
1/2 tsp ginger, finely chopped
1 tbsp spring onion, finely chopped
3/4 tsp salt
1 tsp sesame oil

Beat the eggs in a bowl and add a pinch of salt. Season a wok with tbsp of oil. When the oil starts to smoke add the eggs and stir until just done. Take them out of the wok and let them cool down in a mixing bowl. When cooled down, add the chives, ginger, spring onion, salt and sesame oil and mix well.

Filling 2: pork with baby cabbage
100 g minced pork
150 g baby cabbage, finely chopped
1/2 tsp ginger, finely chopped
1 tbsp spring onion, finely chopped
1/4 tsp salt + a pinch of salt
pinch of white pepper
1/2 tsp sugar
2 tsp light soy sauce
1 tsp rice wine
2 tbsp chicken stock/water
1/2 tsp sesame oil

Put the baby cabbage into a bowl and add the 1/4 tsp of salt, mix well and leave for about 10 minutes. Squeeze water out. Put the minced pork in a mixing bowl and add a pinch of salt and pepper, sugar, light soy sauce and rice wine. Mix well in one direction (I don’t know why this is, but lets trust the Chinese cook in this one) until the meat gets firm. Add 1 tbsp of the chicken stock, stir in the same direction and repeat this. Add sesame oil, ginger and spring onion and mix. Add the cabbage and mix again – now you’re done mixing.

Filling 3: pork with fennel
100 g minced pork
130 g fennel, finely chopped
1/2 tsp ginger, finely chopped
1 tbsp spring onion, finely chopped
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp sugar
3 tsp light soy sauce
1 tsp rice wine
2 tbsp chicken stock/water
1 tsp sesame oil
2 tsp vegetable oil

Put the minced pork into a mixing bowl, add salt, sugar, light soy sauce and rice wine. Mix well – and again, stir in direction – till the meat gets firm. Add the chicken stock 1 tbsp at a time, mixing in between. Add ginger and spring onion, mix again, add fennel and both of the oils and mix again.

Cooking method 1: steaming(蒸饺)
Add a little bit of oil on the steamer plate and place the dumplings on top. Put the steamer over the boiling water – steam for about 8 minutes.

Cooking method 2: pan-frying(锅贴)
Add a little bit of oil on a frying pan and place the dumplings in the pan. Cook them on medium-low heat until the bottom of the dumplings becomes golden brown. Add enough water to cover the dumplings halfway up and put a lid on the pan. Cook until the water is gone, about 4 minutes.

Cooking method 3: boiling(水饺)
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the dumplings to the pan when the water boils, wait until the water boils again and add half a bowl of cold water and wait until the water boils again. Repeat this two times – so you end up adding cold water 3 times. When the water boils again for the last time, they are ready.

5 Responses to “Dumplings - 饺子.”

  1. Michelle

    Beautiful photos! I just made this sort of dumplings for the first time. They were so good, and I can’t wait to try again. I’ve never seen the egg filling before, which sounds wonderful.

    Reply

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